Sunday, April 20, 2014
Ugggh, I hate sick

I have flu. It is unpleasant. I whinge greatly.


Ugggh.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Sunday, April 20, 2014

riddlemehiddleston:

things that say a lot about a person

  • their favourite character
  • the lyrics they write on their hands
  • the colours they wear
  • which murder weapon they prefer
  • how they make their tea

1. It’s really hard to choose a favourite character, partially because I’m not super fandommy by nature, but I’m gonna say Tom Zarek, because I love love love how well he was written. God damn.

2. No lyrics on my hands, but I have a lyric tattoo over my uterus. It reads: ‘There’s more to life than books, you know
But not much more’

3. A lot of black and white, mostly. I used to wear a lot of earthy colours, and then I became really conscious of matching my glasses.

4. This is a difficult one for me, because I’m quite petite and so I can’t easily overpower others, but I do like the idea of a more personal weapon. I think poison, though. Simple and clean.

5. Pricey, flavoured loose-leaf when I have company; dirt cheap orange pekoe teabags when I’m upset or stressed out. Teaspoon of sugar, a teeny, tiny splash of milk. I put the sugar in before the water, so the water immediately dissolves it. I use a kettle, unlike those microwaving heathens.

Saturday, April 19, 2014
Would anyone mind looking over my layout and letting me know of any problems?

It’s… very much designed not for mobile viewing, though. Dunno how it looks on a phone, because mine automatically gives me the mobile version, so.

Friday, April 18, 2014
OH GOOD, THE TEXT IS ILLEGIBLE IN CHROME
Friday, April 18, 2014
I don’t have a tonne of familiarity with Tumblr’s custom CSS, so I decided to just take a premade layout and edit it

Bad idea!
Turns out, the layout I chose was totally broken! It had tables inside of tables endlessly, and the permalink page was totally blank!

So, I probably still need to fix some things up, but at least I got that sorted for tonight.


(my background is sweet, though; so I’m content with that)

Thursday, April 17, 2014

snapchatting:

spice things up in bed with some communism

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Simple, cutesy #manicure, which I didn’t do a great job on.

Simple, cutesy #manicure, which I didn’t do a great job on.

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Lending and borrowing is still legit, I think. If you were borrowing money, they wouldn’t expect the same object back - just the same value. Or sex, weed, favors, blood… you get the idea.



I mean, context would make it obvious in most cases, but what about when it doesn’t? Or, I don’t know, I would just like to be specific while also being laconic. Or something.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Why isn’t there a word for taking something with the intention of replacing it with *new*? Because borrow is often used that way, but borrow implies giving that same item back, which sounds a little odd in the context of, say, a tampon or a cigarette.

Like, I need a simple way of saying that I’d like a smoke, and I will give you a replacement cigarette when I have one available.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Pretty sure I’m the cutest thing I’ve ever seen
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
That shirt is a fucking 6x. Being tiny has some perks, I suppose.

That shirt is a fucking 6x. Being tiny has some perks, I suppose.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

In Britain, make-up might have been hard to find, but it was worn with pride and became a symbol of the will to win. ‘Put your best face forward,’ encouraged a 1942 Yadley advertisement in Churchillian tones. ‘War, Woman and Lipstick' ran a celebrated Tangee campaign. Bright red was the favourite wartime colour for lips and nails and lipstick names were often patriotic: Louis Phillippe's Patriotic Red; Fighting Red by Tussy and Grenadier - The new Military red created by Tattoo, effective with air force blue and khaki.

During wartime, a subtle change had taken place in the marketing and the perception of make-up. It was no longer about making a woman seem ‘dainty’, but making her look and feel strong. Rosie the Riveter became a wartime icon in the USA, representing the six million women working in factories for the war effort. [Rockwell] portrayed Rosie as a vast figure in work dungarees, her short sleeves revealing arms the size of prize-winning hams. Behind her hangs the stars and stripes, squashed carelessly under her feet is a copy of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf, and on her mighty lap rests a lunch box and a huge riveting machine like an enormous gun. [Her] henna red curls, lipsticked mouth and painted finger nails stress her femininity, emphasising the fact that make-up too was a weapon of war [Madeleine Marsh, Compact and Cosmetics: Beauty from the Victorian Times to the Present Day]

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
addelburgh:

incognito

addelburgh:

incognito